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Xyngular Core4 review

Xyngular Core4 Review (New 2020) – Does it Work? Ingredients, Side-Effects, Results

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Xyngular Core4 review 

The company

Xyngular is a supplement company aimed at providing products that “help combat some of today’s most common health concerns” and “change any individual’s health, wealth and life”. These are lofty claims, in this article we will analyse this claim in 3 main areas: Safety, Efficacy and Value. The “ultimate transformation kit” is Xyngular’s flagship product, presenting itself as “complete nutritional support” including antioxidant drinks, hunger suppression, gut health, energy tablets, sleeping aids, protein powder and a “calorie-mitigation” supplement. This article will focus on two areas of the company: the quality of manufacture and business, as well as the contents of the Ultimate Transformation kit and their safety, effectiveness and value.

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The first thing that is worth mentioning about Xyngular is their business structure as a multi-level marketing, pyramid or “Ponzi” scheme: the better business bureau gave them an “F” for business practice due to the structure of their business and a tendency to over-charge customers or use shady business dealings to boost profits. This has involved generating automatic orders for customers and short-changing their distributor chain for the profit of those further up. Clearly, this isn’t going to result in a great deal of consumer trust so we have to urge caution in any dealings with the company.

Additionally, we noticed when dealing with the website that there is a great deal of ambiguity at every level. The products themselves do not have a pricing structure on the site and the only way to acquire them that we have found is through contacting a local distributor and setting up a “membership” to the company itself. This is either a very novel way of selling dietary supplements or reflects the poor business practices of the company: various customer reviews include hidden charges and costs that could not be explained by the company itself, not to mention the 2015 lawsuit that stated that they had breached the contract of former employees (Freres vs Xyngular corp, 2:13CV400 DAK).

This ambiguity continues when we began to search for clinical evidence for the lofty claims made by the company about its products. Especially in the case of “calorie mitigation” supplements that are supposed to “block” the caloric effects of foods – these astounding claims would be great if they could be supported by any form of scientific evidence or clinical success, but the site has no link to such proof. Additionally, the inclusion of proprietary blends makes it incredibly difficult to actually determine what is in each product: being told that there is a proprietary blend containing a variety of ingredients does not actually give customers proper information on the bulk quantities of the individual ingredients. Ambiguity in these areas is a cause for concern when dealing with dietary supplements because it is essential to understand what you’re ingesting, something that Xyngular makes rather difficult.

Core4: Lean

3 out of 5

Lean is Xyngular’s answer to a diet protein powder – it boasts a 50 calorie per serving including a variety of vitamins and minerals. 50 calories are very low compared to a lot of other protein powders which tend to have 100+, however this is at least partially because Lean’s serving size is 16g (around half of the serving of a regular protein powder) so the numbers aren’t exactly representative. The vitamin and mineral complex is a really positive aspect of this product, but this may be less promising when we consider that the research strongly suggests that whole food bioavailability is either equal or greater than that of extracts or supplementary pills[1].

The important question of effectiveness is whether or not it is the best alternative for health, fitness and wellbeing. With bioavailability being sketchy and serving sizes being used to push the low-calorie properties, it does not seem to be the best alternative. As with most dietary supplements, the best solution is simply a better diet. If you’re lacking in protein and feel like you want to keep the protein powder lean without missing out on the nutrients of more calorie-dense foods, then this may well be a decent choice. However, the simplest and best approach to this problem is to increase the protein and micronutrient content of your diet through lean meats, fish, pulses and vegetables.

Core4: flush

1 out of 5 (unnecessary; possible harmful effects)

Flush is marketed as a detox and gut health product which, invariably, means that it is being sold on the false premise that it has some rare property to “clean” the body. When we see that a weight loss supplement is being sold on the premise of gut health and detox we can generally assume that it is a laxative: Flush’s active ingredient is Senna leaf extract, a common laxative. Senna leaf, however, has an FDA caution attached because it can be harmful if taken for extended periods of time. In fact, extended use of Senna can negatively affect bowel health and develop a dependence on laxatives. Clearly, this is not gut health and it is uncertain why we would need to detox the gut.

Sure, if your average night of eating is low in fibre, high in refined carbohydrates and low in micronutrients then your gut health is going to be poor. However, fixing this problem will generally be more achievable through an increased fibre, fluid and micronutrient intake as well as increasing the presence of natural yoghurt and healthier protein sources in your diet. This could be as simple as consuming a greater quantity of leafy green vegetables, cultured natural yoghurts and pulses – there is no real benefit to treating this problem through dubious laxatives, especially at Xyngular’s prices!

Core4: Cheat+

1 out of 5 (outrageous, unsubstantiated claims)

This is the most outrageous of all of Xyngular’s products – it is a fibre pill that claims to have calorie mitigating properties by “forming a gel, and literally trapping a portion of consumed food […] preventing the body from absorbing a certain amount of calories”. Fibre is a fantastic nutrient and we think that most people should be consuming far more of it, but the suggestion that a fibrous gel would “mitigate” calories from other foods is untenable without serious lab research. As ever, there is no evidence to substantiate these claims and this product in particular starts to sound too good to be true – because it is.

Core4: Accelerate

1 out of 5 (unnecessary; possible harmful effects)

Accelerate follows in a long line of supplements that claim to boost metabolism, burn fat and suppresses appetite. This, simply put, makes it a “fat burner” – a term that is almost universally applied to things that do not, in fact, burn fat. The only thing that will reliably burn fat is existing in a caloric deficit through proper diet and exercise. The green tea extracts that are found in Accelerate and a variety of other supplements are also labelled for caution by the US Pharmacopeia due to reports of hepatoxicity or liver damage[2]. Liver damage was causally linked with green tea extract in over 10% of green tea extract users – this is a risk that is not worth taking, especially when we consider that a proper diet and exercise regimen will provide sufficient stimulus for proper weight loss.

Burning fat should be undertaken at a sustainable pace through proper diet and exercise: attempts to circumvent this process are sometimes marketing ploys and often carry side effects. When attempting to suppress appetite, the best options are high-satiety, nutrient-dense foods, proper hydration and an awareness that weight loss will likely include some minimal discomfort. Treating excessive body fat as a problem to be cured through pills such as accelerate will result in side effects, whereas a proper lifestyle adjustment can address these problems without the threat of liver damage.

Value

Finally, the value of Xyngular products needs mentioning. We found it difficult to give a proper analysis of the value of these products, since the website contains no pricing solutions but the Ultimate transformation kit, their flagship product, has been stated by customers to cost anywhere between $375 and $500+ depending on whether you live in the US or Canada. The core4 kit, mentioned above, will cost around $190-230. Either way, this is an exorbitant cost for a short course of supplements (lasting around 30 days by most reviews) and cannot be justified given the lack of clinical support and the dubious effectiveness of the products. Considering the fact that many, if not all, of these supplements can be effectively replaced by a proper diet and that there are cheaper, more effective supplements on the market it seems that Xyngular products offer poor relative value.

Concluding thoughts

Overall, we’d argue that Xyngular represents another example in the long line of Ponzi schemes that aim at selling quick fixes to serious issues. Diet and health products should be taken as a complement to a healthy diet and should be sustainable long-term changes rather than cleanses or detox. If you insist on spending $$$ on nutritional support, we’d strongly recommend using it on consulting with a registered dietitian – vitamins, minerals, fibre and energy should come from your diet!

Related to Xyngular Core4: Phentaslim Review (New 2020) - Why we rate it as #1

References:

[1] Chung, Rasmussen and Johnson, 2004; “Lutein bioavailability is higher from lutein-enriched eggs than from supplements and spinach in men” in the journal of nutrition, 2004: 134, pp.1887-1893

[2] Sarma et al, 2008: “Safety of green tea extracts: a systematic review by the US Pharmacopeia” in Drug Safety, 2008; 31(6), pp.469-484 [URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18484782]


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About the Author Amanda Roberts

Amanda is a gym instructor and a diet and nutrition fanatic that has reviewed 100s of supplements for the benefit of consumers. She struggled with obesity 7 years ago and after losing more than 30lbs, dedicates most of her time in helping others achieve similar results and transform their lives. You can contact her via the "About Us" page.

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