Vysera CLS Review

Vysera CLS Review (New 2020) – A Magic Weight Loss Solution?

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Vysera CLS Review 

Most of us have a bit of extra weight here and there. As we go through our lives we may eat a little unhealthy from time to time. And over a certain period, we simply gain unwanted weight that is so hard to lose.

At some point, we all get fed up with the way we look. We try to find different methods that could help us lose weight and feel better about ourselves, however mostly unsuccessful. Fortunately, we have Vysera CLS, the ultra-popular diet pill that is said to be different from other similar products on the market.

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Vysera CLS claims to have a special mix of ingredients that can help any user lose a significant amount of weight in just 30 days! It is also said to reduce hip, thigh, buttocks, and waist size, reshaping the whole body in the process. With Vysera CLS, users will immediately experience a boost in mood and energy, without the risk of dieting fatigue or any other side effects.

Wow, Vysera CLS truly sounds like a miracle pill. But can it really deliver the promised results in just 30 days? Keep reading and you will find out in this unbiased review!

How Does Vysera CLS Work?

According to the manufacturers, this diet pill works by inhibiting calorie absorption without the need for a proper diet or exercise plan. Users should take the Vysera CLS pill before each meal which will help reduce the blood sugars levels in the body, providing low insulin levels. This should lead to less hunger and cravings, and therefore weight loss. Dieters can consume up to 2,200 calories per day and still lose weight without exercise.

The official website also claims that Vysera CLS formula is scientifically proven to work, however, no studies were cited that would prove these statements.

Vysera CLS Ingredients

Besides Vitamin B3, Calcium, and Chromium which are the only ingredients with proper dosing information, the rest of Vysera CLS is basically just one big proprietary mix.

Proprietary blends are always a bad sign since supplement companies use them to cover up actual dosing for each component, leaving the consumer without this essential information. This way Vysera CLS raises the risk of side effects and inefficiency.

Be that as it may, here are the ingredients added to the formula:

  1. Vitamin B3 – Crucial vitamin, found in many foods such as meat, fish, and vegetables. Vitamin B3 supplementation is generally used to lower cholesterol levels, as well as blood pressure (1).
  2. Calcium – Extremely important for bone and teeth health, however, there is no evidence that would link Calcium with weight loss (2).
  3. Chromium – This mineral is said to help move glucose out of the bloodstream and into our cells that will use it for energy. However, high doses of Chromium could lead to irregular heartbeat and damaged kidneys, liver, stomach, and nerves (3).

Proprietary Weight Control Component:

  1. Phaseolus Compressus Extract – Better known as white bean extract, this extract is said to decrease the rate of carbohydrate absorption in the body. Without the dosing information it is impossible to determine how effective will it be (4).
  2. Cacao Extract – This popular extract can lower blood pressure, but it may also increase blood sugar levels as well. It also has antioxidant properties (5).
  3. Milk Thistle Extract – This flowering plant contains a white substance that many call “milk”. This substance might have some nutrient value, particularly for helping in the prevention of diabetes and insulin resistance. However, there is no scientific evidence that would prove these statements.
  4. Chlorella Algae Extract – Derived from this well-known freshwater algae, this extract is popularly believed to prevent and treat cancer. Again, no clear evidence was cited.
  5. Shali Seed – Commonly known as Asian rice, this seed is extremely rich in fiber which can suppress appetite in most individuals (6).
  6. Schizonepeta Extract – Generally used for treating maladies such as fever, sore throat, and colds. There is no link between this ingredient and weight loss (7).
  7. Klamath Blue-Green Algae – This form of Algae is almost identical to Spirulina, the widely known super food. Klamath Blue-Green Algae are rich in various vitamins and minerals and have positive effects on the healthy gut bacteria (8).

Proprietary Energy/Focus/Mood Component:

  1. Trimethylxanthine – Is just a fancy name for caffeine, a widely used stimulant. Caffeine has its positive aspects, however, if mixed with other stimulants it could lead to adverse effects like insomnia, nervousness and restlessness, nausea, vomiting, increased heart rate, and stomach irritation (9).
  2. Cayenne Powder – Derived from the spicy Chili pepper, when used for weight loss can suppress appetite and even boost energy levels.
  3. Cutch Tree Powder – A powerful natural ingredient that is said to boost metabolism and energy, however, its properties are yet to be confirmed by science.
  4. Velvet Bean Extract – Represents a form of dopamine taken from the South American plant named Velvet Bean. This extract may improve the brain's ability to experience pleasure (10).
  5. Magnolia Bark – This extract is believed to contain a number of beneficial chemicals that can make its extract useful for weight loss, anxiety and inflammation.
  6. Panax Ginseng – An amazing herb with heaps of benefits. Ginseng can increase circulation, boost erectile function, and improve overall energy levels.
  7. Passionflower Powder – Has no links with weight loss, but it can help with anxiety. However, this plant is also known to induce side effects such as altered consciousness, abnormal heart rhythm, nausea, and drowsiness.
  8. Lemon Balm – Relaxes the body and reduces inflammation and muscle soreness (11).
  9. Jujube Powder – Is best known for its ability to treat a wide range of skin ailments. It can also reduce stress levels, which could benefit the weight loss process.
  10. Chinese Skullcap – Could have some weight loss benefits, however, it is also known to induce liver damage as well as hepatoxicity.
  11. Poria Cocos – Used to treat inflammation, cancer, and diabetes, although studies on the effectiveness of this ingredients are yet to be seen.

Ingredients Summary

Unfortunately, most of the ingredients found in Vysera CLS have no real correlation with weight loss, some of them can improve metabolism and energy, but the majority of them have other purposes. However, the biggest problem with this formulation is the ingredient dosages. Without the valuable dosing information analyzing any scientific evidence is virtually impossible, as available research might use different dosages than the ones found in Vysera CLS.

This supplement has also shown a pretty high risk of adverse effects, as some of the added components might induce a range of unwanted outcomes.

Related to Vysera CLS: Phentaslim Review (New 2020) - Why we rate it as #1

Conclusion

In the end, we saw that Vysera CLS has a rather weak ingredients formula covered by a deceptive marketing plan. The manufacturers did not provide a sufficient amount of important information about its safety and effectiveness. They also did not indicate or warn users about the possible negative effects of their ingredients, but still promote the use of them. There are simply more reliable and credible dietary supplements available on the market that are capable of better and safer results, so your best bet is to go with them.

References:

  1. Talmeez Zeb Shah, Abdul Basit Ali, Saghir Ahmad Jafri, and M.H. Qazi. “Effect of Nicotinic Acid (Vitamin B3 or Niacin) on the lipid profile of diabetic and non – diabetic rats.” Pak J Med Sci. (2013 Sep-Oct). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3858911/
  2. Flynn A. “The role of dietary calcium in bone health.” Proc Nutr Soc. (2003 Nov). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15018485
  3. Anderson RA. “Effects of chromium on body composition and weight loss.” Nutr Rev. (1998 Sep). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9763876
  4. Marilyn L Barrett and Jay K Udani. “A proprietary alpha-amylase inhibitor from white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): A review of clinical studies on weight loss and glycemic control.” Nutr J. (2011 Mar 17). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3071778/
  5. Latif R. “Health benefits of cocoa.” Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care (2013 Nov). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24100674
  6. Lamiaa A.A. Barakat and Rasha Hamed Mahmoud. “The antiatherogenic, renal protective and immunomodulatory effects of purslane, pumpkin and flax seeds on hypercholesterolemic rats.” N Am J Med Sci. (2011 Sep). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3271396/
  7. Chen SG, Cheng ML Chen KH, Horng JT, Liu CC, Wang SM, Sakurai H, Leu YL, Wang SD, Ho HY. “Antiviral activities of Schizonepeta tenuifolia Briq. against enterovirus 71 in vitro and in vivo.” Sci Rep. (2017 Apr 20).
    Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28428548
  8. Chai Siah Ku, Yue Yang, Youngki Park, and Jiyoung Lee. “Health Benefits of Blue-Green Algae: Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.” J Med Food (2013 Feb). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3576896/
  9. Heckman MA, Weil J, Gonzalez de Mejia E. “Caffeine (1, 3, 7-trimethylxanthine) in foods: a comprehensive review on consumption, functionality, safety, and regulatory matters.” J Food Sci. (2010 Apr). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20492310
  10. Lampariello LR, Cortelazzo A, Guerranti R, Sticozzi C, Valacchi G. “The Magic Velvet Bean of Mucuna pruriens.” J Tradit Complement Med. (2012 Oct). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24716148
  11. Andrew Scholey, Amy Gibbs, Chris Neale, Naomi Perry, Anastasia Ossoukhova, Vanessa Bilog, Marni Kras, Claudia Scholz, Mathias Sass, and Sybille Buchwald-Werner. “Anti-Stress Effects of Lemon Balm-Containing Foods.” Nutrients. (2014 Nov). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4245564/

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About the Author Emily Robinson

Emily has spent the last 8 years comparing, reviewing and analyzing ingredients in the supplements industry. She has worked extensively with dieticians, nutritionists and personal trainers to separate fact from fiction and help people achieve their fitness goals. In her free time she works and enjoys the outdoors with her husband and 2 children. You can contact her via the "About Us" page.

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