SeroVital-Hgh Review

SeroVital-Hgh Review 2019 – Effective Way to Boost Muscle Growth?

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SeroVital-Hgh Review 

The human growth hormone is one of the most important hormones in the whole body. It is produced by the pituitary gland, which is a small pea-sized gland that is located at the base of our brains.

The term growth hormone completely describes its function since this hormone induces growth and a variety of other functions as well.

Our body naturally produces this hormone, however as we get older, HGH levels plummet. After that, the body produces less and less of this hormone. But don’t worry, with today’s technology, manufacturers were able to create HGH supplements that should fix this problem.

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SeroVital-Hgh is one of the more popular dietary supplements specifically formulated to increase growth hormone production. This supplement was designed to eliminate the need for expensive prescription injections, claiming to naturally boost HGH levels by an insane 682%. SeroVital provides a range of amino acids that are said to increase HGH production and should stimulate the pituitary gland. With spiked HGH levels, users are said to build muscle mass at a much faster pace and lose fat more easily, all without the addition of side effects.

Very impressive promises indeed. But are they true? In this review, we will thoroughly examine SeroVital-Hgh, summarize the results and give you all the necessary information about this product. Read on!

How Does SeroVital-Hgh Work?

With its natural formula, SeroVital-Hg is said to stimulate the pituitary gland, which would then increase the production of the growth hormone in a natural manner without any questionable ingredients, needles, and chemicals. With elevated HGH levels your body will also increase the production of testosterone, another key hormone that is responsible for muscle growth and endurance. Also, according to the manufacturers of SeroVital, this supplement was the first way to raise HGH naturally outside of the doctor’s office. This formula was supposedly created after 30 years of research, which eventually transformed into an oral HGH solution that is now available to everyone.

SeroVital-Hgh Ingredients

Unfortunately, SeroVital-Hgh is made out of a proprietary blend, and by now almost everyone knows why proprietary blends are a bad thing. For the new readers, manufacturers use these blends to hide the actual dosing information for each ingredient separately, making it impossible to determine their true potential.

Be that as it may, here are the ingredients found in SeroVital-Hgh:

  1. L-Lysine HCL – Is a popular amino acid used in the making of various medicines and supplements (1). Usually, it is used to treat cold sores and other respiratory problems. It is also believed to aid in muscle growth, fat burning, as well as athletic performance. But sadly, there is still no concrete evidence that would suggest that L-Lysine supplementation is necessary (2).
  2. L-Arginine HCL – Another important amino acid, necessary for proper bodily function. It occurs naturally in dairy, fish, red meat, and poultry (3). When taken orally, L-Arginine transforms into nitric oxide which is proven to improve blood flow by widening the arteries. It could also trigger the release of growth hormone, insulin, and other important hormones. However, research is still inconclusive about its properties (4).
  3. Oxo-Proline – Is a glutamic acid derivative, found in numerous supplements. Oxo-Proline is said to regulate the neutral amino acid transport across the blood-brain barrier which could increase the production of human growth hormone (5). Oxo-Proline also produces collagen and cartilage, which keeps the muscle and joints flexible at all times. However, with only a few trials concluded on this ingredients, there simply is not enough evidence of its true abilities (6).
  4. N-Acetyl L-Cysteine – Another amino acid that is popularly supplemented for its believed benefits. It is commonly used to treat Tylenol and carbon monoxide poisoning, and with its antioxidant properties, it may even prevent cancer (7). Unfortunately, this amino acid has virtually no correlation with human growth hormones or even testosterone for that matter (8).
  5. L-Glutamine – Is a crucial amino acid that occurs naturally in our bodies. L-Glutamine is produced in the muscle tissue, and the bloodstream distributes it to all organs of the body (9). It can improve the immune system, gut health, and other important functions of the body especially during periods of stress. L-Glutamine also supply’s the cells with energy, assisting in the production of other chemicals in the system. L-Glutamine supplementation usually induces a slight boost in recovery and immune function (10).
  6. Schizonepeta – Represents a traditional Japanese plant know as Catnip. It’s believed to aid with skin conditions, colds, sore throats, heavy menstrual periods, rashes, psoriasis, and fever (11). Schizonepeta is also debated to have some anti-inflammatory abilities, however, further investigation is required in order to prove its effectiveness. Although this herb is known to cause potential liver damage if consumed in higher doses than the recommended one (12) (13).

Ingredients Summary

SeroVital-Hgh might contain only natural ingredients, but most of them have almost no scientific proof that would back up any of their claims. Not only that, but the dosages of each ingredient are also not listed on the supplement label, which is a big issue. This way the consumers are not informed about the exact amount of each component added to the formula, which results in the possible inefficiency of the supplement. There is simply no way to determine the true potential of the proprietary blend ingredients without knowing the actual dosages they come in, leaving a big question mark on this dietary supplement.

SeroVital-Hgh Readers: Noom is offering our readers a 14-day trial for a limited time. Click Here for this special offer!

Conclusion

SeroVital-Hgh comes at an unaffordable price of $99 for a 30-day supply, placing it in the category of expensive dietary supplements.

SeroVital-Hgh has big claims about its HGH-boosting properties, but it’s still unclear if it actually delivers HGH-related benefits. Not to mention the possibly underdosed ingredients, lack of scientific proof, and possible side effects, making this product a deal breaker. Customer reviews are also negative, complaining about the lack of results and refund problems. With the variety available on today’s supplement market, you will surely find a better alternative.

References:

  1. Morales A, García H, Arce N, Cota M, Zijlstra RT, Araiza BA, Cervantes M. “Effect of L-lysine on expression of selected genes, serum concentration of amino acids, muscle growth and performance of growing pigs.” J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr (Berl). (2015 Aug). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25354230
  2. Tesseraud S, Peresson R, Lopes J, Chagneau AM. “Dietary lysine deficiency greatly affects muscle and liver protein turnover in growing chickens.” Br J Nutr. (1996 Jun). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8774230
  3. Pahlavani N, Entezari MH, Nasiri M, Miri A, Rezaie M, Bagheri-Bidakhavidi M, Sadeghi O. “The effect of l-arginine supplementation on body composition and performance in male athletes: a double-blinded randomized clinical trial.” Eur J Clin Nutr. (2017 Apr). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28120856
  4. Alvares TS, Conte CA, Paschoalin VM, Silva JT, Meirelles Cde M, Bhambhani YN, Gomes PS. “Acute l-arginine supplementation increases muscle blood volume but not strength performance.” Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. (2012 Feb). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22251130
  5. Persaud C, Forrester T, Jackson AA. “Urinary excretion of 5-L-oxoproline (pyroglutamic acid) is increased during recovery from severe childhood malnutrition and responds to supplemental glycine.” J Nutr. (1996 Nov 26). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8914954
  6. Yilin Liu, Annastasia S. Hyde, Melanie A. Simpson, and Joseph J. Barycki. “Emerging regulatory paradigms in glutathione metabolism.” Adv Cancer Res. (2014 Jul 27). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4515967/
  7. Vida Mokhtari, M.Sc, Parvaneh Afsharian, Ph.D, Maryam Shahhoseini, Ph.D, Seyed Mehdi Kalantar, Ph.D, and Ashraf Moini, M.D. “A Review on Various Uses of N-Acetyl Cysteine.” Cell J. (2017 Apr-Jun). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5241507/
  8. Chad Kerksick and Darryn Willoughby. “The Antioxidant Role of Glutathione and N-Acetyl-Cysteine Supplements and Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress.” J Int Soc Sports Nutr. (2005 Dec 9). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2129149/
  9. Hernández Valencia SE, Méndez Sánchez L, Clark P, Moreno Altamirano L, Mejía Aranguré JM. “[GLUTAMINE AS AN AID IN THE RECOVERY OF MUSCLE STRENGTH: SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF LITERATURE].” Nutr Hosp. (2015 Oct 1). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26545503
  10. Cruzat VF, Rogero MM, Tirapegui J. “Effects of supplementation with free glutamine and the dipeptide alanyl-glutamine on parameters of muscle damage and inflammation in rats submitted to prolonged exercise.” Cell Biochem Funct. (2010 Jan 22). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19885855
  11. Sin-Guang Chen, Mei-Ling Cheng, Kuan-Hsing Chen, Jim-Tong Horng, Ching-Chuan Liu, Shih-Min Wang, Hiroaki Sakurai, Yann-Lii Leu, Shulhn-Der Wang, and Hung-Yao Ho. “Antiviral activities of Schizonepeta tenuifolia Briq. against enterovirus 71 in vitro and in vivo.” Sci Rep. (2017 Apr 20). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5430552/
  12. Fung D, Lau CB. “Schizonepeta tenuifolia: chemistry, pharmacology, and clinical applications.” J Clin Pharmacol. (2002 Jan 9). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11817365
  13. Byun MW. “Schizonepeta tenuifolia ethanol extract exerts anti-inflammatory activity through the inhibition of TLR4 signaling in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophage cells.” J Med Food. (2014 Mar 17). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24650252

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About the Author Steven Taylor

Steven has researched over 500 weight-loss programs, pills, shakes and diet plans. He has also worked with nutritionists specializing in weight loss while coaching people on how to transform their physiques and live healthy lives.

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