RoxyLean ECA Review

RoxyLean ECA Review 2019 – The Ultimate Fat Burning Formula?

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RoxyLean ECA Review 

When it comes to weight loss supplements there are only a few capable of making a real impact. Today’s supplement market is saturated with low-quality products, which were only created to sell and not to fulfill their purpose. Fat burners are one of the bestselling weight loss supplements in the world, however, a lot of them aren’t nearly as good as their manufacturers say.
 

Today, we will be looking at one such product called BPI Sports RoxyLean ECA.

This diet pill promises increased fat burning, improved muscle definition, and raised metabolism. RoxyLean ECA contains a formula made up of stimulants created to help with the fat burning process.

Besides its thermogenic capabilities, RoxyLean ECA is also designed to enhance energy levels and focus, which is always an excellent addition to any dietary supplement. Fortunately, there is also a lot of feedback available due to the many customers worldwide, which is always good to have while considering a dietary supplement of any sort.

Without further ado, let’s check out what RoxyLean ECA truly has to offer!

How Is RoxyLean ECA Meant to Work?

RoxyLean ECA falls into the category of thermogenic fat burners, which are intended to increase your metabolism for a few hours after you take them, resulting in increased calorie burning even at rest. RoxyLean ECA should also suppress any cravings, so you won’t feel hungry all the time.

Combined, these two functions should be able to provide excellent weight loss results with virtually no effort.

RoxyLean ECA Ingredients

Besides Vitamin B1 and Niacin which are the only ingredients with actual dosing information, the rest of RoxyLean ECA is just one big proprietary blend.

By now, everyone knows about the shady aspects of proprietary blends. Supplement companies use proprietary blends to mix different ingredients together, providing no clear indication of the quantities of each ingredient. With no clear information about the doses, RoxyLean ECA increases the risk of side effects and inefficiency.

Ingredients found in RoxyLean ECA:

  1. Vitamin B1 (Thiamin) (185mg) – Is a body coenzyme used to metabolize food for energy and maintain proper heart and nerve function. Vitamin B1 has many impeccable health benefits, for instance, it is used to digest and extract energy from the food we consume and turn it into usable energy in the form of ATP. Vitamin B1 deficiencies can cause numerous problems, the biggest one being the abolishment of molecules found in carbohydrates and proteins, which then can’t be properly used by our body. RoxyLean ECA only provides a small dose of this crucial vitamin (1).
  2. Niacin (30mg) – Is one of the most important vitamins, used to synthesize NAD and NADP (Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide). These enzymes play a crucial role in the breakdown of fatty acids, carbohydrates, and other nutrients. Increasing Niacin concentrations, more enzymes will be available for digestion, therefore raising our metabolic rate. RoxyLean ECA gives us the perfect dose of this essential vitamin, even slightly over the recommended daily intake (2).

RoxyLean ECA Proprietary Blend (510mg):

  1. Caffeine Anhydrous – Is a highly potent ingredient, commonly found in every fat burning supplement. Caffeine Anhydrous increases memory, detoxes the liver, and keeps you focused and alert, fighting fatigue and muscle soreness at the same time. It can also prevent obesity and improve sexual health. RoxyLean ECA doesn’t mention the total amount of caffeine added to the proprietary blend, so it’s impossible to determine if this fat burner added a safe amount. Serious side effects include insomnia, jitters, nausea, diarrhea, mood swings, headaches, migraines, rapid heartbeat, and more (3).
  2. Lemon – Lemons are an excellent and rich source of Vitamin C. This essential nutrient protects our bodies against immune system deficiencies. Lemons also aid in digestion and mineral absorption, giving us more energy and alertness throughout the day (4). New studies even suggest that drinking lemon water can naturally boost our metabolism, breaking down fat cells and enhancing the weight loss experience (5).
  3. Adhatoda Leaf – Also known as the Vasaka Leaf, a plant extract used in Indian medicine, Adhatoda’s soothing properties help with muscle spasms, breathing, and general respiratory health. The problem with this ingredient is the lack of scientific research. There is very little evidence backing up Adhatoda Leaf claims, making it impossible to determine if it’s truly healthy or even safe (6).
  4. Yohimbe Bark – Is believed to inhibit the actions of certain enzymes in the body and is commonly used as an aphrodisiac. Yohimbe primarily targets alpha-2 receptors, inhibiting the breakdown of fats (lipolysis) in stubborn areas, allowing our body to burn fat more efficiently. However, many users have reported numerous side effects after using Yohimbe Bark. Some countries even banned this substance (UK, Canada). Although it’s effective, a lot of risks are involved (7).
  5. Goldenseal Root – Better known as the “Chemical Inhibitor,” Goldenseal Root is the most expensive ingredient found in any dietary supplement, with a price mark of $250 per pound. Goldenseal Root claims to dramatically improve digestion, with the addition of appetite suppression. There is no scientific proof that would back up these claims though (8).
  6. White Willow Root – Is one of the several varieties of the Willow tree. White Willow is believed to reduce the tension from headache-related pain, providing similar properties to aspirin. Potential side effects include nausea, digestive issues, and bleeding disorders. Some studies even show that White Willow consumption could possibly lead to fatal intestinal bleeding and allergic reactions (9).
  7. Chinese Skullcap Root – Is a herb that has antibacterial, antifungal and sedative properties. It claims to help decrease inflammation and apoptosis (sudden cell death). Studies have shown that it might cause liver problems if used in high doses (10).
  8. Rauwolfia Serpentina – Generally used as a medicine for treating high blood pressure and heart-related problems, it can also be used to treat insomnia and fever. Research suggests that Rauwolfia Serpentina could promote depression, anxiety, and even impotence (11).

Ingredients Summary

After going over the ingredients, we can only say that RoxyLean ECA provides inferior value for its claims.

The big issue with the ingredients is the proprietary blend. The customer is not provided with exact ingredient quantities, so it’s virtually impossible to determine the effectiveness of the supplement.

There is also an unknown amount of caffeine added, which can be potentially harmful. Another problematic ingredient is Yohimbe, which is clinically shown to cause serious side effects. Mixed with caffeine, Yohimbe can lead to dangerous cardiovascular diseases.

The majority of other ingredients are also not proven to be safe or effective, making the overall quality of these ingredients unacceptable.
 

Conclusion

Overall, RoxyLean ECA cannot be recommended for purchase for the simple reason of the severe lack of important information about the effectiveness and safety of its ingredients. BPI Sports official website does mention the possible negative effects of some ingredients but still promotes the use of them. There are undeniably more reliable and credible dietary supplements available on the market that are capable of real results, so your best bet is to go with them instead of RoxyLean ECA.

References:

  1. Guilland JC. “[Vitamin B1 (thiamine)].” Rev Prat. (2013 Oct). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24298824
  2. Villines TC, Kim AS, Gore RS, Taylor AJ. “Niacin: the evidence, clinical use, and future directions.” Curr Atheroscler Rep. (2012 Feb). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22037771
  3. Nawrot P, Jordan S, Eastwood J, Rotstein J, Hugenholtz A, Feeley M. “Effects of caffeine on human health.” Food Addit Contam. (2003 Jan). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12519715
  4. Yoji Kato, Tokio Domoto, Masanori Hiramitsu, Takao Katagiri, Kimiko Sato, Yukiko Miyake, Satomi Aoi, Katsuhide Ishihara, Hiromi Ikeda, Namiko Umei, Atsusi Takigawa, and Toshihide Harada. “Effect on Blood Pressure of Daily Lemon Ingestion and Walking.” J Nutr Metab. (2014). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4003767/
  5. Yoshiko Fukuchi, Masanori Hiramitsu, Miki Okada, Sanae Hayashi, Yuka Nabeno, Toshihiko Osawa, and Michitaka Naito. “Lemon Polyphenols Suppress Diet-induced Obesity by Up-Regulation of mRNA Levels of the Enzymes Involved in β-Oxidation in Mouse White Adipose Tissue.” J Clin Biochem Nutr. (2008 Nov). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2581754/
  6. Shrivastava N, Srivastava A, Banerjee A, Nivsarkar M. “Anti-ulcer activity of Adhatoda vasica Nees.” J Herb Pharmacother. (2006). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17182484
  7. Chen P, Bryden N. “Determination of Yohimbine in Yohimbe Bark and Related Dietary Supplements Using UHPLC-UV/MS: Single-Laboratory Validation.” J AOAC Int. (2015 Jul-Aug). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26268969
  8. Keivan A. Ettefagh, Johnna T. Burns, Hiyas A. Junio, Glenn W. Kaatz, and Nadja B. Cech. “Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) extracts synergistically enhance the antibacterial activity of berberine via efflux pump inhibition.” Planta Med. (2011 May). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3100400/
  9. Shara M, Stohs SJ. “Efficacy and Safety of White Willow Bark (Salix alba) Extracts.” Phytother Res. (2015 Aug).
    Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25997859
  10. Leslie Yang, Andrew Aronsohn, John Hart, and Donald Jensen. “Herbal hepatoxicity from Chinese skullcap: A case report.” World J Hepatol. (2012 Jul 27). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3409358/
  11. Bhatara VS, Gupta S. “History of Rauwolfia serpentina.” Can J Psychiatry. (1997 Sep). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9307840

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About the Author Emily Robinson

Emily has spent the last 8 years comparing, reviewing and analyzing ingredients in the supplements industry. She has worked extensively with dieticians, nutritionists and personal trainers to separate fact from fiction and help people achieve their fitness goals. In her free time she works and enjoys the outdoors with her husband and 2 children.

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