Mancore 2 Review

Mancore 2 Review (New 2020) – A Miracle Testosterone Booster?

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Mancore 2 Review 

When you start to see a decline in your testosterone levels, you may not realize what you're dealing with at first. You know you feel tired and run down, you're putting on fat where you never had before, you’re edgy and irritable, but you might not know that decreasing testosterone levels are the root cause, which is especially common in your late 30's.

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If you are suffering from low testosterone levels, a natural supplement like Mancore 2 may be the right answer. Complete Nutrition, the popular manufacturer of this supplement claims they've developed a special formula that will stimulate the production of healthy testosterone levels in order to improve libido and to boost overall energy. Mancore 2 users should also experience an increase in muscle mass and a decrease in excess weight.

All of this sounds great but is everything true? We will take a closer look at this testosterone booster and summarize the results just for you. Just read on!

How Does Mancore 2 Work?

With its powerful ingredients, Mancore 2 supposedly causes the body to naturally produce more testosterone, as opposed to injecting testosterone into your body (testosterone replacement therapy), which can cause more problems later on. The safest way to correct low testosterone levels is to encourage your body to create more of the hormone internally and not force it into your system with needles. It is unnatural to inject hormones into the body, which will just throw you off even further.

Luckily, Mancore 2 claims to safely trigger testosterone production, creating a balanced testosterone level for the long-term.

Mancore 2 Ingredients

Besides Zinc and DHEA which are the only ingredients with actual dosing information, the rest of Mancore 2 is just one big proprietary blend.

Proprietary blends are never a good sign. Supplement companies use these blends to mix different ingredients together, providing no clear indication about the dosages for each compound. With no clear dosing information, Mancore 2 increases the risk of side effects and inefficiency.

Nonetheless, here is the list of ingredients included in Mancore 2:

  1. Zinc (7.5mg) – Is an essential mineral which benefits the body in various ways, it helps with hormonal balance, improves the immune system, enhances cognition, and facilitates digestion (1). Zinc has the ability to act as an anti-oxidant, which may have significant effects on many chronic diseases like cancer or heart disease. Zinc is also believed to benefit testosterone production, which is why it’s included in Mancore 2. Although this testosterone boost only provides 7.5mg of this crucial mineral, it's not enough considering that a healthy person should consume anywhere from 10 to 15mg of Zinc per day (2).
  2. Tribulus Terrestris – A staple ingredient in almost every testosterone booster. It is believed that Tribulus boosts muscle strength and development, treats impotence, elevates libido, and even improves physical performance (3). However, with no studies backing up its claims, you can’t expect any significant testosterone boosting properties (4).
  3. White Button Mushroom – Is believed to reduce the tension from headaches, having similar properties like aspirin (5). Some studies suggest that it can boost testosterone levels by stopping enzymes converting into estrogen. However, more research has to be done on this topic (6).
  4. Long Jack Root – This ingredient does not have a lot of actual proof in terms of its ability to increase testosterone levels. Although, many studies have shown that it improves libido and erectile function (7).
  5. Cordy-Ceps Sinensis – Originally used in ancient Asian medicine, primarily in Tibetan and Chinese traditions (8). This ingredient can cure a multitude of ailments, of which erectile dysfunction and BHP are included (9).
  6. Stinging Nettle Leaf – Has been used mostly to cure urinary problems, like benign prostate hyperplasia. There is some evidence which suggests that Stinging Nettle Root elevates testosterone production by inhibiting testosterone from converting to estrogen, however, more research has to be concluded (10).
  7. Bee Propolis Extract – Many studies show that Bee Propolis actually helps with hormone regulation, specifically testosterone regulation. It is also believed that Bee Pollen contains amino acids which can increase the metabolism by dissolving fat cells in the body (11).
  8. DHEA (25mg) – Represents dehydroepiandrosterone, a compound that is naturally occurring in the body. The brain, gonads, and adrenal glands produce DHEA naturally (12). Studies have shown a significant impact of DHEA on testosterone production and muscular development. However, the World Anti-Doping Agency has banned it, which ensures anti-doping policies for sports organizations around the globe are even. In 1985, the FDA also banned products containing DHEA since supplement companies made dishonest promises about this ingredient. Although, with better standards today, they eventually allowed DHEA back on the market (13) (14).

Ingredients Summary

After looking at the quality of Mancore 2 ingredients, the main issue is certainly the dosing information. With no proper dosing information, this testosterone booster puts every user at a serious risk of adverse effects. Ingredients like Zinc and Stinging Nettle Leaf can be useful if provided in suitable quantities, which we can’t determine with Mancore 2. There is simply no way to fairly assess this product since we don’t know the amounts of each active component. Additionally, there have yet to be any clinical studies on this testosterone boosting formula as a whole.

Related to Mancore 2: Phentaslim Review (New 2020) - Why we rate it as #1

Conclusion

Overall, with a weak formula and a deceptive marketing plan, there is no way we could recommend you buy Mancore 2. The simple reason is the severe lack of important information about its safety and effectiveness. Complete Nutrition does not indicate or warn users about the possible negative effects of some ingredients, but still promotes the use of them. There are undoubtedly more reliable and credible dietary supplements available on the market that are capable of real long-term results, so your best bet is to choose one of them.

References:

  1. Nazanin Roohani, Richard Hurrell, Roya Kelishadi, and Rainer Schulin. “Zinc and its importance for human health: An integrative review.” J Res Med Sci. (2013 Feb). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3724376/
  2. Sunil Sazawal, Usha Dhingra, Saikat Deb, Maharaj K. Bhan, Venugopal P. Menon, and Robert E. Black. “Effect of Zinc Added to Multivitamin Supplementation Containing Low-dose Vitamin A on Plasma Retinol Level in Children—A Double-blind Randomized, Controlled Trial.” J Health Popul Nutr. (2007 Mar). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3013264/
  3. Qureshi A, Naughton DP, Petroczi A. “A systematic review on the herbal extract Tribulus terrestris and the roots of its putative aphrodisiac and performance enhancing effect.” J Diet Suppl. (2014 Mar). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24559105
  4. Rogerson S, Riches CJ, Jennings C, Weatherby RP, Meir RA, Marshall-Gradisnik SM. “The effect of five weeks of Tribulus terrestris supplementation on muscle strength and body composition during preseason training in elite rugby league players.” J Strength Cond Res. (2007 May). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17530942
  5. Chen S, Oh SR, Phung S, Hur G, Ye JJ, Kwok SL, Shrode GE, Belury M, Adams LS, Williams D. “Anti-aromatase activity of phytochemicals in white button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus).” Cancer Res. (2006 Dec 15). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17178902
  6. Noriko Kanaya, Makoto Kubo, Zheng Liu, Peiguo Chu, Charles Wang, and Yate-Ching Yuan, Shiuan Chen. “Protective Effects of White Button Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) against Hepatic Steatosis in Ovariectomized Mice as a Model of Postmenopausal Women.” PLoS One. (2011 Oct 25). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3201963/
  7. Chee Keong Chen, Wan Mohd Zahiruddin Wan Mohamad, Foong Kiew Ooi, Shaiful Bahari Ismail, Mohamad Rusli Abdullah, and Annie George. “Supplementation of Eurycoma longifolia Jack Extract for 6 Weeks Does Not Affect Urinary Testosterone: Epitestosterone Ratio, Liver and Renal Functions in Male Recreational Athletes.” Int J Prev Med. (2014 Jun). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4085925/
  8. Hardeep S. Tuli, Sardul S. Sandhu, and A. K. “Pharmacological and therapeutic potential of Cordyceps with special reference to Cordycepin.” 3 Biotech. (2014 Feb).  Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3909570/
  9. Ashok Kumar Panda and Kailash Chandra Swain. “Traditional uses and medicinal potential of Cordyceps sinensis of Sikkim.” J Ayurveda Integr Med. (2011 Jan-Mar). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3121254/
  10. Bhaskar Mani Adhikari, Alina Bajracharya, and Ashok K. Shrestha. “Comparison of nutritional properties of Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) flour with wheat and barley flours.” Food Sci Nutr. (2016 Jan). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4708629/
  11. Vijay D. Wagh. “Propolis: A Wonder Bees Product and Its Pharmacological Potentials.” Adv Pharmacol Sci. (2013). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3872021/
  12. Rutkowski K, Sowa P, Rutkowska-Talipska J, Kuryliszyn-Moskal A, Rutkowski R. “Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA): hypes and hopes.” Drugs. (2014 Jul). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25022952
  13. Liu TC, Lin CH, Huang CY, Ivy JL, Kuo CH. “Effect of acute DHEA administration on free testosterone in middle-aged and young men following high-intensity interval training.” Eur J Appl Physiol. (2013 Jul).
    Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23417481
  14. Labrie F. “DHEA, important source of sex steroids in men and even more in women.” Prog Brain Res. (2010). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20541662

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About the Author John Wright

John has been a fitness enthusiast for over 10 years, starting out while struggling with obesity as a teenager. Over the years he has advised numerous clients on how to transform their physiques and their lives. As a writer on Nutrition Inspector he aims to help others achieve real results by staying clear of the common hype and false claims in the supplement industry! You can contact him via the "About Us" page.

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