Leptigen Review

Leptigen Review 2019 – An Ordinary Diet Pill or Something More?

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Leptigen Review 

Leptigen is an all-natural dietary supplement that is said to contain the types of ingredients that will help any individual burn excess fat and ultimately lose weight. Using a powerful mix of stimulants and minerals, Leptigen is said to help dieters lose far more weight than simply diet and exercise alone. According to the manufacturers, Leptigen has undergone a number of clinical studies that have supposedly proven its effectiveness, making it one of the rare scientifically-proven diet pills. The studies have not only found that Leptigen aids with weight management, but its ingredients are also said to help decrease waist size and hip circumference.

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These type of claims seem a bit too farfetched, don’t they? To see how much truth is behind the “scientific proof”, simply continue reading and find out everything you need to know about Leptigen.

How Does Leptigen Work?

Leptigen works by utilizing the three most common fat burning methods:

  • It increases the metabolic rate which will lead to an expanded calorie consumption. The more calories you burn, the higher chance you have of losing fat. This is the simple principle for weight loss – you need to burn more calories than you consume.
  • It suppresses appetite allowing users to avoid all those pesky cravings that can form a dangerous eating habit. This will prolong the fat burning process, keeping users full for a longer period of time.
  • And lastly, Leptigen can also boost your energy levels throughout the day, giving you enough motivation and alertness to push forward.

Leptigen Ingredients

Leptigen contains two types of ingredients. The first type is the active ingredients that actually have exact measurements and recommended dosages. The second group is the small proprietary blend, with no clear quantities or measurements for each component.

Active Ingredients:

  1. Green Tea Extract (200mg) – Has a truly wide range of health benefits, the most known one being its ability to aid in weight loss (1). With a high concentration of caffeine, this isn’t a surprise. More energy will allow users to workout longer and better, resulting in an overall increased calorie consumption. However, high doses of caffeine can induce serious side effects such as nervousness and restlessness, insomnia, nausea, stomach irritation, and vomiting (2) (3).
  2. Chromium (100mcg) – Represents an essential trace mineral, necessary for human health (4). Before we go over the benefits of Chromium supplementation, we need to mention that the human body requires a very small dose of this mineral. Chromium is generally used to improve blood sugar levels in prediabetic and diabetic individuals. This essential mineral is also believed to hold appetite suppressing properties, however, this claim is not backed up by science and is yet to be proven (5). Now, the real issue with this ingredient is its possible side effects. High Chromium doses like the one found in Leptigen are suspected to cause serious liver, kidney, and blood cell damage. The recommended dose of Chromium is only 30mcg a day. Leptigen provides a crazy dose of 100mcg, which is absolutely ridiculous (6).
  3. Caffeine (75mg) – Is certainly one of the most researched ingredients today. Caffeine has been reported to increase metabolism, focus, energy, and much more (7). Leptigen provides a sensible dose of only 75mg (less than one cup of coffee), so you won’t experience any negative effects like jitters and anxiety. However, a problem might occur when we mix Caffeine and other stimulants. Combining multiple stimulant compounds could lead to serious health issues. Respectable diet pills should only contain one type of stimulant (8).

Proprietary Blend:

  1. Sphaeranthus Indicus – Also known as the Globe Indian Thistle, a traditional herb used in Ayurvedic (Indian) medicine. Sphaeranthus Indicus is believed to hold a number of health benefits, however like a lot of traditional herbs more scientific and clinical research is needed before we can conclude its final benefits (9). Although preliminary studies do show promising results. In a recent animal study, the alcoholic extract from this plant appeared to be effective at reducing body weight and blood sugar levels, but under highly specific conditions (10).
  2. Garcinia Mangostana – Is a plant that belongs to the genus Garcinia, which is native to East Asia. Garcinia contains a substance called Hydroxycitric Acid (HCA) that has been shown across numerous clinical research to be effective at reducing overall fat accumulation, also boosting the metabolic rate. An improved metabolism can lead to increased energy expenditure, which puts the body in the best position for weight loss (11). Stable blood glucose is another positive effect of Garcinia Mangostana. A recent study actually concluded that Garcinia can help control blood sugar levels by changing the way cells take up sugar for energy. This way our body consumes carbohydrates in a more profound way, instead of storing them as fat (12) (13).

Ingredients Summary

There is some potential clinical proof of the effectiveness of the ingredients found in Leptigen. However, some of these ingredients can cause a range of side effects. For instance, high doses of Chromium like the one found in Leptigen is known to cause serious side effects that range from cell damage to heart disease and high blood pressure.

Not to mention the combination of different stimulants that can induce more adverse effects. Overall, Leptigen provides a mediocre ingredient formula that might very well do more harm than good.

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Conclusion

Before we conclude the final verdict on Leptigen, it’s essential to look at the product as a whole, its customer reviews, and the evidence it provides. The manufactures might offer some scientific evidence, however, there is still a lot to cover. Also, none of these ingredients have been proven to be both safe and effective when combined. Many customers have also failed to see any benefits from them. But the absolute deal breaker for Leptigen is definitely its potential side effects. These adverse effects can have serious long-term consequences on the whole body.

Taking everything into consideration, there are certainly safer and more effective options on the market today that are capable of real results at a minimal risk.

References:

  1. Sabu M Chacko, Priya T Thambi, Ramadasan Kuttan, and Ikuo Nishigaki. “Beneficial effects of green tea: A literature review.” Chin Med. (2010 Apr 6). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2855614/
  2. Yasuo SUZUKI, Noriyuki MIYOSHI, and Mamoru ISEMURA. “Health-promoting effects of green tea.” Proc Jpn Acad Ser B Phys Biol Sci. (2012 Mar 9). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3365247/
  3. Schönthal AH. “Adverse effects of concentrated green tea extracts.” Mol Nutr Food Res. (2011 Jun 6).
    Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21538851
  4. Yinan Hua, Suzanne Clark, Jun Ren, and Nair Sreejayan. “Molecular Mechanisms of Chromium in Alleviating Insulin Resistance.” J Nutr Biochem. (2012 Apr 4). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3308119/
  5. Anderson RA. “Chromium as an essential nutrient for humans.” Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. (1997 Aug).
    Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9380836
  6. Broadhurst CL, Domenico P. “Clinical studies on chromium picolinate supplementation in diabetes mellitus–a review.” Diabetes Technol Ther. (2006 Dec). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17109600
  7. Jennifer L. Temple, Christophe Bernard, Steven E. Lipshultz, Jason D. Czachor, Joslyn A. Westphal, and Miriam A. Mestre. “The Safety of Ingested Caffeine: A Comprehensive Review.” Front Psychiatry. (2017 May 26). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5445139/
  8. David M.Penetar, Una McCann, David Thorne, Aline Schelling, Cynthia Galinski, Helen Sing, Maria Thomas, and Gregory Belenky. “Effects of Caffeine on Cognitive Performance, Mood, and Alertness in Sleep-Deprived Humans.” Institute of Medicine (US) Committee on Military Nutrition Research (1994). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK209050/
  9. Judith S. Stern, Jan Peerson, Artatrana T. Mishra, Venkata Sadasiva Rao Mathukumalli, and Poorna Rajeswari Konda. “Efficacy and Tolerability of an Herbal Formulation for Weight Management.” J Med Food. (2013 Jun 16). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3684102/
  10. Chellappandian M, Thanigaivel A, Vasantha-Srinivasan P, Edwin ES1, Ponsankar A, Selin-Rani S, Kalaivani K, Senthil-Nathan S, Benelli G. “Toxicological effects of Sphaeranthus indicus Linn. (Asteraceae) leaf essential oil against human disease vectors, Culex quinquefasciatus Say and Aedes aegypti Linn. And impacts on a beneficial mosquito predator.” Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. (2017 Apr 28). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28455566
  11. Onakpoya I, Hung SK, Perry R, Wider B, Ernst E. “The Use of Garcinia Extract (Hydroxycitric Acid) as a Weight loss Supplement: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Clinical Trials.” J Obes. (2011 Dec 14). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21197150
  12. Kohsuke Hayamizu, MS, Yuri Ishii, MS, Izuru Kaneko, DVM, Manzhen Shen, Yasuhide Okuhara, Norihiro Shigematsu, Hironori Tomi, PhD, Mitsuhiro Furuse, PhD, Gen Yoshino, MD, PhD, and Hiroyuki Shimasaki, PhD. “Effects of garcinia cambogia (Hydroxycitric Acid) on visceral fat accumulation: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.” Curr Ther Res Clin Exp. (2003 Sep). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4053034/
  13. Li Oon Chuah, Swee Keong Yeap, Wan Yong Ho, Boon Kee Beh, and Noorjahan Banu Alitheen. “In Vitro and In Vivo Toxicity of Garcinia or Hydroxycitric Acid: A Review.” Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. (2012 Aug 9). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3424601/

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About the Author Emily Robinson

Emily has spent the last 8 years comparing, reviewing and analyzing ingredients in the supplements industry. She has worked extensively with dieticians, nutritionists and personal trainers to separate fact from fiction and help people achieve their fitness goals. In her free time she works and enjoys the outdoors with her husband and 2 children.

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