Jadera Diet Pills Review

Jadera Diet Pills Review (New 2020) – High Quality Weight Management Solution?

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Jadera Diet Pills Review 

Weight loss supplements enjoyed a boost in popularity over the last few years, with people in increasing numbers buying these products and hoping for the best results.

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Unfortunately, not all brands and pills are equally effective and safe. This harsh reality could be enough to dissuade some people from purchasing a diet pill.

However, there are some brands on the market today that stand out as a safe and reliable way for one to lose weight quickly, without the risk of side effects or unwanted drug interactions with prescription medicine.

One weight loss product that made a large impact on consumers is Jadera. Jadera Diet Pills are specifically created to address a variety of needs that those who want to lose weight have, it has been found to offer one of the best well-rounded aids available.

Jadera does not contain any synthetic substances and uses all natural ingredients to support different parts of the health and weight loss process. These include the burning of excess fat, boosting the metabolism, and the suppression of appetite. By focusing on these crucial parts of weight loss, Jadera is able to provide users with the support they need to get fit and healthy.

Without further ado, let’s jump into the analysis of this supplement during which we will discuss its working process, ingredients, side effects, and more! Just read on!

How Does Jadera Work?

Jadera Diet Pills claim to work in various ways, providing a strong property to act as a metabolism booster, appetite suppressant, and fat burner. Jadera forces the body to stimulate the intensity of the fat burning process, by activating its potent natural ingredients. It also suppresses any cravings, so you won’t feel hunger at all. Jadera can specifically optimize your metabolic rate, allowing you to burn fat constantly throughout the day.

Combined, all these properties should be able to induce better weight loss results by increasing your resting metabolic rate, keeping you satiated during the day.

Jadera Ingredients

We are pleasantly surprised to see that Jadera actually provides a very detailed label with all the ingredients and doses. Jadera Diet Pills contain only 5 active ingredients, and they include:

  1. Bitter Orange Extract (87.5mg) – A natural extract traditionally used for treating constipation and other digestive ailments. Today, we often see this ingredient in weight loss supplements (1). Bitter Orange contains synephrine, a substance that has been linked to weight reduction and energy improvement (2). However, synephrine is also linked to numerous side effects. This extract has also been banned in some countries because of its adverse effects (3).
  2. Cassia Seed Extract (59.5mg) – Is well-known for its medicinal benefits and is commonly used to treat problems related to the liver, kidneys, intestines, and vision (4). Cassia Seeds have laxative properties that, when used in the weight loss environment, could result in temporary weight management. However, users will only lose water weight and little to no fat (5).
  3. Job’s Tears Extract (52.5mg) – Also named coix or play, is a broad-leaf native to the forests of China that has been used in Eastern medicine for thousands of years to treat diseases as diverse as arthritis and smallpox (6). The interesting name Job’s Tears came about due to the teardrop shape of the actual seed. There is very little research available on this plant, some studies concluded in China and Korea might indicate possible health benefits. One study from 2004, published in “Life Science” showcased how a research project on mice showed that the mice injected with a Job’s Tears extract lost a significant amount of weight compared to the control group. Still, this is only one study, more research has to be concluded (7).
  4. Mulberry Leaf Extract (45.5mg) – Harvested from the Mulberry tree, indigenous to Asia. This leaf has been used in Eastern medicine as a weight loss aid. The extract from this leaf called zuccarin is believed to inhibit the absorption of carbohydrates (8). This property is supposed to regulate blood sugar levels while at the same time preventing any unnecessary sugar cravings. Some substances contained within Mulberry have a similar property to those used in treating type-2 diabetes (9). These substances can slow down the sugar breakdown in the intestines, so they are absorbed slowly into the bloodstream. This would create stable blood sugar levels (10). However, the slight problem with this extract is that it’s still not FDA approved.
  5. Medicinal Starch (105mg) – Is actually just plain cornstarch. We can only assume that it’s used as a filler agent in this supplement (11).

Ingredients Summary

Jadera Diet Pills actually bring some quality ingredients to the table. The ingredients formula contains a lot of right components capable of creating easier and successful weight loss results. However, the big problem with the ingredients are the possible side effects. Compounds such as the Bitter Orange and Mulberry Leaf Extract can be potentially harmful, raising a serious safety concern.

Jadera Safety Concern

In 2011, the FDA issued a statement about Jadera Diet Pills, stating, “FDA laboratory analysis confirmed that “Jadera 100% Natural Weight Loss Supplement” contains sibutramine. Sibutramine is a potentially harmful controlled substance that was removed from the U.S. market back in 2010 for safety reasons (12).

We also mentioned that Jadera Diet Pills contain Mulberry Leaf Extract, a non-FDA approved ingredient that can also stand as a threat to overall health.

Related to Jadera Diet Pills: Phentaslim Review (New 2020) - Why we rate it as #1

Conclusion

While Jadera Diet Pills do contain all natural ingredients, they, unfortunately, neglect a lot of important questions. The crucial one being the FDA announcement about the product’s hidden dangers. Jadera Diet Pills supposedly contain a hidden stimulant drug that is not listed on the product's label, leaving the consumer in the dark about the potential adverse effects.

Therefore, we encourage you to follow the advice of the FDA and instead seek out a more reliable and proven method to lose weight with or without the assistance of a weight loss supplement.

References:

  1. Stohs SJ, Preuss HG, Shara M. “A review of the human clinical studies involving Citrus aurantium (bitter orange) extract and its primary protoalkaloid p-synephrine.” Int J Med Sci. (2012). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22991491
  2. Peixoto JS, Comar JF, Moreira CT, Soares AA, de Oliveira AL, Bracht A, Peralta RM. “Effects of Citrus aurantium (bitter orange) fruit extracts and p-synephrine on metabolic fluxes in the rat liver.” Molecules. (2012 May 16). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22592089
  3. Tzeng TF, Lu HJ, Liou SS, Chang CJ, Liu IM. “Cassia tora (Leguminosae) seed extract alleviates high-fat diet-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver.” Food Chem Toxicol. (2013 Jan 28). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23026700
  4. Jeongsu Nam and Hyunju Choi. “Effect of butanol fraction from Cassia tora L. seeds on glycemic control and insulin secretion in diabetic rats” Nutr Res Pract. (2008 Winter). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2788183/
  5. Tzeng TF, Lu HJ, Liou SS, Chang CJ, Liu IM. “Reduction of lipid accumulation in white adipose tissues by Cassia tora (Leguminosae) seed extract is associated with AMPK activation.” Food Chem. (2013 Jan 15).
    Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23122166
  6. Ching-Chuan Kuo, Ph.D., Huang-Hui Chen, and Wenchang Chiang, Ph.D. “Adlay (薏苡 yì yĭ; “soft-shelled job's tears”; the seeds of Coix lachryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf) is a Potential Cancer Chemopreventive Agent toward Multistage Carcinogenesis Processes.” J Tradit Complement Med. (2012 Oct-Dec). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3942904/
  7. Xi XJ, Zhu YG, Tong YP, Yang XL, Tang NN, Ma SM, Li S, Cheng Z. “Assessment of the Genetic Diversity of Different Job's Tears (Coix lacryma-jobi L.) Accessions and the Active Composition and Anticancer Effect of Its Seed Oil.” PLoS One. (2016 Apr 12). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27070310
  8. Da Villa G, Ianiro G, Mangiola F, Del Toma E, Vitale A, Gasbarrini A, Gasbarrini G. “White mulberry supplementation as adjuvant treatment of obesity.” J Biol Regul Homeost Agents. (2014 Jan-Mar). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24750800
  9. A. Hunyadi, E. Liktor-Busa, Á. Márki, A. Martins, N. Jedlinszki, T. J. Hsieh, M. Báthori, J. Hohmann, and I. Zupkó. “Metabolic Effects of Mulberry Leaves: Exploring Potential Benefits in Type 2 Diabetes and Hyperuricemia.” Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. (2013). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3870074/
  10. Mark Lown, Richard Fuller, Helen Lightowler, Ann Fraser, Andrew Gallagher, Beth Stuart, Christopher Byrne, and George Lewith. “Mulberry-extract improves glucose tolerance and decreases insulin concentrations in normoglycaemic adults: Results of a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study.” PLoS One. (2017). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5321430/
  11. Michael J. Ormsbee, Christopher W. Bach, and Daniel A. Baur. “Pre-Exercise Nutrition: The Role of Macronutrients, Modified Starches and Supplements on Metabolism and Endurance Performance.” Nutrients. (2014 May 6). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4042570/
  12. Naofumi Bunya, Keigo Sawamoto, Shuji Uemura, Ryoko Kyan, Hiroyuki Inoue, Junichi Nishida, Hidemichi Kouzu, Nobuaki Kokubu, Tetsuji Miura, and Eichi Narimatsu. “Cardiac arrest caused by sibutramine obtained over the Internet: a case of a young woman without pre‐existing cardiovascular disease successfully resuscitated using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.” Acute Med Surg. (2017 Jul). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5674461/

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About the Author Emily Robinson

Emily has spent the last 8 years comparing, reviewing and analyzing ingredients in the supplements industry. She has worked extensively with dieticians, nutritionists and personal trainers to separate fact from fiction and help people achieve their fitness goals. In her free time she works and enjoys the outdoors with her husband and 2 children. You can contact her via the "About Us" page.

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