Bliss Go Pack Review 2019 – Does it work? Ingredients, Side-Effects, User Votes

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bliss go pack   Good quality women's supplements are few and far between in the fitness industry. Whilst Men can be stung by bad products they also tend to get more of the good quality supplements aimed at them.

Women on the other hand are usually given the choice of fat burners or meal replacement shakes. Companies such as Juice Plus, Herbalife, The Cambridge Diet etc … are mostly aimed at women, and fat burning supplements are also big business.

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So Bliss Go is an interesting product, on the one hand it is clearly made up of fat-burners with high levels of caffeine, Green tea, Synephrine, and Guarana. But on the other, they have clearly made an effort to add ingredients that aid cognitive function, and improve female libido.

Whether these ingredients work or not will be discussed in detail later, but it is nice to see a company trying to stand out from the crowd a bit.

The Bliss Go Pack is sold by a company called 1st Phorm which is based in St Louis, MO. According to their website they hire a lot of NASM qualified personal trainers to answer any questions that a client may have regarding weight loss, though they show no evidence of these qualified trainers – no names or registration details are immediately obvious. But if this is the case, it's a nice touch.

The product itself consists of 4 packs (you can buy the packs separately if desired), these are: Dynactive Complex, Neurocept, Biotherm Matrix, and Bliss Fusion. Awful name choices aside, the company claims that the products are designed to work in synergy together. Meaning that each product when put together becomes stronger than the sum of its parts. There are 25 ingredients spread out between the 4 packs, which makes it difficult to find out whether synergy is achieved.

The dosage is 2 pills twice per day and the product is supposed to be taken 5 out of 7 days, with the whole pack lasting 4 weeks. With a price tag of $169.99 (though the website currently offers them for $99) you could say that the product is a little on the expensive side.

Even if it works it is still not an option for those of you on a budget, particularly when you factor in the cost of eating healthy, and signing up for a gym into it (both would be necessary if you want to see results). Though in defence of Bliss Go, they do offer a 110% money back guarantee! Which is a pretty decent offer, and one that is rare in the supplement industry.

So now that we know the price let's take a look at the manufacturer's claims. Bliss Go is supposed to: Boost Metabolism, Balance Hormones, Balance the Thyroid, Melt Body Fat, Boost Energy (naturally), Eliminate Cravings, Suppress Appetite, Lower Cortisol, Improve Sleep, and Increase Overnight Metabolism.

To find out how Bliss Pack goes about tackling these claims we will now analyse the ingredient lists of the four packs. We won't go into detail for every ingredient as there are 25, but we will highlight the best and worst and try to give an overall view on what Bliss Pack is like.

Pack #1. Dynactive Complex

  • Caffeine – The main ingredient in every fat-burner in the industry (and some would say the only real ingredient) caffeine is obviously first on the list. It has so many benefits on both performance and body composition. Caffeine can: Increase metabolism in low-habitual users [1], increase thermogenesis [2] improve performance in both high-intensity exercise [3], and low intensity exercises (such as long-distance running) [4]. It can also increase power output [5], and lower the rate of perceived exertion [6], it can also reverse the negative effects of your circadian rhythm on training [7]. The downsides to caffeine is that you can quickly build up a tolerance to it, particularly if you are taking the high doses necessary to achieve the results specified.
  • Picamilon – This is a synthetic drug that is a combination of Niacin and gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABAG), Bliss Go claims that this ingredient “increases mental focus and brain function” and it is sold in Russia to treat Anxiety but that doesn't mean it increases focus, if anything it would surely produce the opposite effect? Either way the FDA has not approved this drug and it seems strange that Bliss Go would bother putting it in their product at all.
  • Hordenine – Bliss Go claims that Hordenine can increase energy and burn fat, both claims could be correct but there isn't enough evidence to support either right now.
  • N Methyl Tyramine – NMT is very similar to Hordenine (mentioned above) and Synephrine (which is an ingredient in the Biotherm matrix) and is believed to increase fat loss by acting “as a neurotransmitter and regulates dopamine, norephinephrine, epinephrine, and noradrenaline levels” [8].
  • Cocoa Extract – Contains caffeine and Theobromine, and has been shown to increase blood flow [9], lower blood pressure, and reduce LDL-Cholesterol.
  • Huperzine – A. – A cognitive enhancer that Bliss Go Pack claims can improve focus.

Pack #2. Neurocept

The Neurocept pack is all based around improving cognitive function, so increasing focus, attention etc … Some of the ingredients seem to have some evidence backing their claims, however is improving function something that people are that interested in?

Pack #3. Biotherm Matrix

  • Green Tea – Seen as the fat-loss supplement by many, green tea has been shown to burn fat but at high doses, and only in people who are non-habitual caffeine consumers [10]. Though there are many other benefits to consuming green tea other than fat-loss.
  • Coleous Forskohli – This is a herb that has been shown to increase testosterone and improve fat loss [11] it may also have an effect on fatigue but there is less evidence to support this.
  • Evodiamine – This is a Chinese herb that may have an effect on fat loss by raising metabolism through thermogenesis. There aren't any studies that link this to humans, but there are plenty of studies on mice and rats that have shown this to be the case [12].
  • Cayenne Pepper – Part of the Capsicum species of peppers Cayenne Pepper contains a compound known as Capsaicin. Some studies suggest that Capsaicin could help fight obesity due to its positive effect on lipolysis [13].
  • Taraxacum Officinale Powder – Or dandelion root extract to give its more common name, this can be used as a diuretic which can help reduce water weight [14]. The question is do you really want a diuretic? They can be dangerous and are banned in most sports.
  • Synephrine – Also known as Bitter Orange Extract, Synephrine has been proven to increase resting metabolism [15], and led to an increase in weight loss when taken in a 12 week study [16].
  • Green Coffee Bean Extract – Green Coffee bean extract can lead to reduced body fat when taken for an extended time [17] but the results are minor. It also seems to help lower blood pressure.
  • Guarana Seed Extract – Guarana is essentially a highly caffeinated seed, which means that any benefits from it can be attributed to its caffeine content. One study on rats found that it increased lipolysis which would lead to fat loss [18].
  • Diiodotyrosine – Stimulates the Thyroid and can lead to an increase in metabolism

Pack #4. Bliss Fusion

  • Damiana Powder – This has been added so that it can increase Estrogen levels and as it is believed to act as an aphrodisiac (which there is little evidence to support).
  • Ashwagandha – Can lower anxiety [19], and a lowering of Cortisol [20]. Another study found that by lowering stress it could act as a libido in already stressed rats [21].

Other Ingredients

  1. Niacin
  2. B-12
  3. B-6

Conclusion

At the beginning of this article I said that it was pleasant that Bliss Go had made the effort to make this product more than just a fat-burning supplement. However, this product really stands out as a fat-burner with the effects on cognition being a nice bonus but little more. None of the reviews reference the improved concentration levels or increased memory, they talk about fat loss.

Due to the high caffeine content, Bliss Go Pack should provide a decent fat burning effect in those women who are non-habitual caffeine takers. For those who are, you may want to try avoiding additional caffeine whilst taking this product and it would be beneficial to cut down your caffeine intake significantly for a few weeks prior to taking Bliss Go.

Out of the 4 packs, the Dynactive Complex and the Biotherm Matrix seem the most encouraging. If you have been scared off by the price tag then getting these two and avoiding the others might work.

On the whole Bliss Go Pack is a decent supplement for fat-loss, and has a few other benefits too. It suffers from having a high price tag and from not mentioning the amounts of each ingredient which is pretty crucial information.

Bliss Go Pack Readers: Use the Noom App to lose weight or just get fit, without the need for supplements. Find out what's possible with healthier, lifelong and sustainable results!
Don't spend a fortune on supplements!

References

[1] : Astrup, A., Toubro, S., Cannon, S., Hein, P., Breum, L., Madsen, J. 1990. Caffeine: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of its thermogenic, metabolic, and cardiovascular effects in healthy volunteers. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 51(5): 759-67

[2] Dulloo, A., Geissler, C., Horton, T., Collins, A., Miller, D. (1989) Normal caffeine consumption: influence on thermogenesis and daily energy expenditure in lean and post-obese human volunteers. The American Society for Clinical Nutrition 49(1): 44-50

[3] Wiles, J., Coleman, D., Tegerdine, M. Swaine, I. 2006. The effects of caffeine ingestion on performance time, speed and power during a laboratory-based 1 km cycling time trial. Journal of Sports Sciences 24(11): 1165-1171

[4] Burke, L. 2008. Caffeine and Sports Performance. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism 33(6): 1319-1334

[5] Lane, S., Areta, J., Bird, S., Coffey, V., Burke, L., Desbrow, B., Leonidas, G., Hawley, J. 2013. Caffeine ingestion and cycling power output in a low or normal muscle glycogen state. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise 45(8): 1577-1584

[6] Lane, S., Areta, J., Bird, S., Coffey, V., Burke, L., Desbrow, B., Leonidas, G., Hawley, J. 2013. Caffeine ingestion and cycling power output in a low or normal muscle glycogen state. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise 45(8): 1577-1584

[7] Mora-Rodriguez, R., Pallares, J., Lopez-Samanes, A., Ortega, J., Fernandez-Elias. 2012. Caffeine ingestion reverses the Circadian Rhythm effects on Neuromuscular performance in highly resistance-trained men. PLoS One 7(4): e33807

[8] Bliss Go Pack. 2016. Ingredients. [ONLINE] Available at: https://blissgopack.com/ingredients?” target=”_blank”>. [Accessed 25 July 2016].

[9] Loffredo, L., Perri, L., Catasca, E., Pignatelli, P., Brancorsini, M., Nocella, C., De Falco, E., Bartimoccia, S., Frati, G., Carnevale, R., Violi, F. 2014. Dark Chocolate acutely improves walking autonomy in patients with peripheral artery disease. Journal of the American Heart Association 2;3(4)

[10] Hursel, R., Viechtbauer, W., Westerterp-Plantenga, M. 2009. The effects of green tea on weight loss and weight maintenance: a meta-analysis. International Journal of Obesity 33(9): 956-61

[11] Godard, M., Johnson, B., Richmond, S. 2005. Body composition and hormonal adaptions associated with forskolin consumption in overweight and obese men. Obesity Research 13(8): 1335-43

[12] Wang, T., Wang, Y., Kontani, Y., Kobayashi, Y., Sato, Y., Mori, N., Yamashita, H. 2008. Evodiamine improves diet-induced obesity in a uncoupling protein-1-independent manner: involvement of antiadipogenic mechanism and extracellularly regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling. Endocrinoligy149(1): 358-66

[13] Shin, K., Moritani, T. 2007. Alterations of autonomic nervous activity and energy metabolism by capsaicin ingestion during aerobic exercise in healthy men. Journal of Nutritional Science & Vitaminology 53(2): 124-32

[14] Clare, B., Conroy, R., Spelman, K. 2009. The diuretic effect in human subjects of an extract of Taraxacum officinale folium over a single day. Journal of Alternative & Complimentary Medicine 15(8): 929-34

[15] Stohs, S., Preuss, H., Keith, S., Keith, P., Miller, H., Kaats, G. 2011. Effects of p-synephrine alone and in combination with selected bioflavonoids on resting metabolism, blood pressure, heart rate and self-reported mood changes. International Journal of Medical Sciences 8(4): 295-301

[16] Stohs, S., Preuss, H., Shara, M. 2012. A review of the human clinical studies involving Citrus aurantium (bitter orange) extract and its primary protoalkaloid p-synephrine. International Journal of Medical Sciences 9(7): 527-38

[17] Thom, E. 2007. The effect of chlorogenic acid enriched coffee on glucose absorption in healthy volunteers and its effect on body mass when used long-term in overweight and obese people. The Journal of International Medical Research 35(6): 900-8

[18] Lima, W., Carnevali, L., Eder, R., Costa Rosa, L., Bacchi, E., Seelaender, M. 2005. Lipid metabolism in trained rats: effect of guarana (Paullinia cupana Mart.) supplementation. Clinical Nutrition 24(6): 1019-28

[19] Andrade, C., Aswath, A., Chaturvedi, S., Srinivasa, M., Raguram, R. 2000. A double-blind, placebo-controlled evaluation of the anxiolytic efficacy ff an ethanolic extract of withania somnifera. Indian Journal of Psychiatry 42(3): 295-301

[20] Chandrasekhar, K., Kapoor, J., Anishetty, S. 2012. A prospective, randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study of safety and efficacy of a high-concentration full-spectrum extract of ashwagandha root in reducing stress and anxiety in adults. Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 34(3): 255-62

[21] Bhattacharya, S., Muruganandam, A. 2003. Adaptogenic activity of Withania somnifera: an experimental study using a rat model of chronic stress. Pharmacology, Biochemistry, & Behaviour 75(3): 547-55


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About the Author Matthew Smith

Matt Smith is a fitness and nutrition writer with more than 10 years experience as a personal trainer, and a degree in Sports Science from London Metropolitan University. He has written for many fitness websites, and runs his own blog and podcast at beernbiceps.com

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