BioMuscle XR Review

BioMuscle XR Review (New 2020) – The Best Growth Formula?

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BioMuscle XR Review 

Want to increase muscle mass but not sure where to start? Just like taking part in weight loss, when dieters reach their set destination, trying to lose even more becomes almost impossible.

It's in these situations that a change in diet and supplementation is needed. It is believed that taking such measures can significantly stimulate protein synthesis and increase testosterone, which are the two key factors for acquiring desirable muscle mass. This is where BioMuscle XR may come into play.

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BioMuscle XR is a bodybuilding supplement that promises to enhance muscle growth and power with its completely natural and pure ingredients. The use of BioMuscle XR is also said to boost one’s workout endurance and overall performance, creating better results faster. The manufacturers of this “muscle growth accelerator” even offer an almost free trial for this product, allowing users to test the results of this supplement.

To see if there is any catch attached to this product simply continue reading and find out everything you need to know about BioMuscle XR!

How Does BioMuscle XR Work?

BioMuscle XR works within the body to increase all the important processes needed to build more muscle mass, one of them being protein synthesis. This process is what actually causes our muscles to grow. Without adequate protein synthesis, a person cannot gain muscle mass. Unfortunately, our body is designed to only synthesize so much protein, so there is a limit to how large our muscles can grow.

However, with BioMuscle XR, users can supposedly dramatically speed up and increase the frequency at which protein synthesis occurs. Therefore BioMuscle XR can help your body to fully utilize and absorb every nutrient you consume, increasing protein synthesis.

Another way BioMuscle XR can be beneficial is by potentially elevating the body’s property to retain nitrogen. For the uninformed, nitrogen is the primary building block of protein. Our body needs to retain as much nitrogen as possible since this process is directly correlated to protein and muscle gains.

BioMuscle XR also has thermogenic and testosterone boosting properties that will supposedly decrease the fat stores in the body and further increase the muscle building process.

BioMuscle XR Ingredients

The first big problem we face with BioMuscle XR is the ingredients list, which is mainly a proprietary blend. But why are proprietary blends bad?

These blends are mixtures of various ingredients and each ingredient does not have clear dosing information. This raises a huge concern for underdosing and side effects, as the consumer is not informed about the exact amount of each component.

Nevertheless, here are ingredients found in BioMuscle XR:

  1. L-Arginine Alpha-Ketoglutarate 2-1 – Represents an amino acid that can act as a circulatory and testosterone booster (1). Its main function was actually to aid with kidney, intestinal, and stomach disorders. Many supplement companies claim that this ingredient has enormous testosterone enhancing properties, which explains why most testosterone boosters contain it. However, this ingredients lacks any reliable scientific proof that would prove its claims (2).
  2. L-Arginine – Is the original form of the L-Arginine amino acid and has many benefits. This amino acid is found in foods such as turkey, chicken, peanuts, dairy, spirulina, and beans (3). It is a building block of protein which helps with muscle building and muscle preservation. Some research even suggests that it can treat erectile dysfunction, high blood pressure, and cardiovascular problems. L-Arginine is also said to stimulate the release of growth hormones, insulin, and other substances in the body. The slight problem with this amino acid is the mixed scientific studies that don’t fully prove its effectiveness (4).
  3. L-Arginine Monohydrochloride – Another form of this amino acid, better known as L-Arginine HCL. Some studies suggest that it can boost exercise endurance and immune system function, and it may also lower blood pressure and help treat heart problems (5). However, most of these studies are still inconclusive and bring no real proof to the table (6).
  4. L-Citrulline – Is a non-essential amino acid that actually converts into L-Arginine in the kidneys, which is then further transformed into nitric oxide (7). Nitric oxide is extremely important as it stimulates growth hormone production in our bodies. For this reason, L-Citruline is believed to help boost the body’s production of nitric oxide which can help with blood flow and muscular development (8). This amino acid is very often found in muscle-building products and many testosterone boosters (9) (10).

Ingredients Summary

BioMuscle XR might provide only natural ingredients, however, most of them have almost no scientific proof that would back up any of their properties. This is not the only issue though, the dosages for each ingredient are also not listed on the supplement label. This way consumers are not informed about the possible inefficiency or side effects of the supplement. In the end, there is simply no way to determine the true potency of this proprietary blend of ingredients without actually knowing the exact dosages for each component, leaving a big question mark on this whole formula.

Related to BioMuscle XR: Phentaslim Review (New 2020) - Why we rate it as #1

Conclusion

BioMuscle XR carries an unaffordable price tag of $89.73, placing it in the category of expensive dietary supplements. And about the free trial we mentioned at the beginning of this review, it is actually a complete scam as users reported that they were charged the full price of the supplement immediately after the 14-day trial period ended.

BioMuscle XR had really big claims about its muscle boosting properties, however, it is still unclear if it actually delivers any benefits at all. Not to mention the possibly underdosed ingredients, lack of scientific proof, and potential adverse effects, making this supplement a waste of money and time. Customer reviews are also fairly negative, complaining about the lack of results and refund issues. Today’s supplement market is huge, you will surely find a better alternative.

References:

  1. Willoughby DS, Boucher T, Reid J, Skelton G, Clark M. “Effects of 7 days of arginine-alpha-ketoglutarate supplementation on blood flow, plasma L-arginine, nitric oxide metabolites, and asymmetric dimethyl arginine after resistance exercise.” Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. (2011 Aug 21). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21813912
  2. Benjamin Wax, Andreas N Kavazis, Heather E Webb, and Stanley P Brown. “Acute L-arginine alpha ketoglutarate supplementation fails to improve muscular performance in resistance trained and untrained men.” J Int Soc Sports Nutr. (2012 Apr 12). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3428651/
  3. Naseh Pahlavani, Mostafa Jafari, Omid Sadeghi, Masoud Rezaei, Hamid Rasad, Hossein Ali Rahdar, and Mohammad Hasan Entezari. “L-arginine supplementation and risk factors of cardiovascular diseases in healthy men: a double-blind randomized clinical trial.” Version 2. F1000Res. (2017 Jun 22). Viewed at:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5510020/
  4. Pahlavani N, Entezari MH, Nasiri M, Miri M, Rezaie M, Bagheri-Bidakhavidi M, Sadeghi O. “The effect of l-arginine supplementation on body composition and performance in male athletes: a double-blinded randomized clinical trial.” Eur J Clin Nutr. (2017 Apr 9). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28120856
  5. Davi Vieira Teixeira da Silva, Carlos Adam Conte-Junior, Vânia Margaret Flosi Paschoalin, and Thiago da Silveira Alvares. “Hormonal response to L-arginine supplementation in physically active individuals daily.” Food Nutr Res. (2014 Mar 25). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3967014/
  6. Stefanie M Bode-Böger, Rainer H Böger, Andrea Galland, Dimitrios Tsikas, and Jürgen C Frölich. “L-arginine-induced vasodilation in healthy humans: pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic relationship.” Br J Clin Pharmacol. (1998 Nov 26). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1873701/
  7. Morita M, Hayashi T, Ochiai M, Maeda M, Yamaguchi T, Ina K, Kuzuya M. “Oral supplementation with a combination of L-citrulline and L-arginine rapidly increases plasma L-arginine concentration and enhances NO bioavailability.” Biochem Biophys Res Commun. (2014 Nov 7). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25445598
  8. Barassi A, Corsi Romanelli MM, Pezzilli R, Damele CA, Vaccalluzzo L, Goi G, Papini N, Colpi GM, Massaccesi L, Melzi d'Eril GV. “Levels of l-arginine and l-citrulline in patients with erectile dysfunction of different etiology.” Andrology. (2017 Mar 5). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28178400
  9. Sureda A, Cordova A, Ferrer MD, Tauler P, Perez G, Tur JA, Pons A. “Effects of L-citrulline oral supplementation on the polymorphonuclear neutrophils oxidative burst and nitric oxide production after exercise.” Free Radic Res. (2009 Sep 4). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19585317
  10. Jordan R Moon, Roxanne M Vogel, Paul H Falcone, Matt M Mosman, Aaron C Tribby, Chad M Hughes, Jonathan D Griffin, Schyler B Tabor, Dylan J LeFever, Stephen B McChaughey, Michael P Kim, and Jordan M Joy. “A comparison of citrulline and arginine for increasing exercise-induced vasodilation and blood flow.” J Int Soc Sports Nutr. (2015 Sep 21). Viewed at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4595542/

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About the Author Steven Taylor

Steven has researched over 500 weight-loss programs, pills, shakes and diet plans. He has also worked with nutritionists specializing in weight loss while coaching people on how to transform their physiques and live healthy lives. You can contact him via the "About Us" page.

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